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Students show how the Chinese language may need to be adjusted to suit different situations and relationships. They identify some of the differences in using Chinese language that reflect the different places it is spoken or who is using the language, and identify some places where Chinese is spoken.

Year 4 Chinese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required to communicate in the Chinese language developed in Year 3 and focuses on extending the oral communication skills of students. Students communicate in Chinese, interacting and socialising orally with the teacher and peers to exchange information about aspects of their personal worlds, including their daily routines at home and school. They contribute to class activities and request assistance in learning activities. Students exchange simple correspondence in writing to report on their daily routines at home and at school.

They locate and convey factual information from familiar types of spoken and visual sources and they locate factual information in written texts to inform others using learnt words, phrases and characters.

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Students create and present their own representations of familiar songs, poems or stories. They also create short imaginative texts such as storyboards or cartoons using modelled language. Students become familiar with the systems of the Chinese language, understanding the components of Pinyin. They recognise high frequency Chinese characters related to their personal world and they use context-related vocabulary and simple sentences to generate language for a range of purposes.

Students begin to develop a metalanguage for Chinese to talk about language, using terms similar to those used in English. Students are supported to identify vocabulary and expressions that reflect different cultural values, traditions or practices.

In Year 4 students continue to require extensive support with their language learning. Students practise using Chinese, participating in action-related talk and completing tasks while relying on teacher modelling, prompts and repetition. Students respond non-verbally to spoken Chinese in the classroom and their understanding of Chinese is dependent on context and on teacher intonation, gestures and facial expressions.

Students continue to be encouraged to use Chinese as much as possible for social interactions and in learning tasks. Locate and convey factual information from familiar types of spoken and visual sources related to personal and social worlds ACLCHC Locate factual information, key words or familiar characters in texts related to their personal and social worlds and use this information to inform others using learnt words, phrases and characters ACLCHC Use visual, print or online dictionaries, word lists and pictures to translate simple familiar texts such as labels or captions ACLCHC Recognise and use context-related vocabulary in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes.

Recognise that Chinese contains influences from other languages and understand the diversity of languages and cultures represented in the classroom ACLCHU They write simple correspondence using formulaic language, Chinese characters and Pinyin with some guidance. Students identify and convey some factual information from spoken and visual texts related to their personal and social worlds.

They locate some key words, familiar characters and factual information in written texts and convey information with guidance, using learnt words, phrases and characters. Students create and present their own representations of familiar imaginative texts. They create short written imaginative texts using simple characters and modelled, short sentences with guidance. Students translate some familiar, high-frequency words and use dictionaries and word lists, with guidance, to translate simple familiar texts.

Students identify ways in which identity is reflected through cultural practices and norms. They identify the components and structures of some familiar Chinese characters. Students recognise and use, both orally and in writing, a range of vocabulary. They recognise and use elements of grammar in simple sentences to record observations, with a satisfactory level of accuracy.

Students understand that Chinese sentences have a particular word order. They explore basic sentence structure in Chinese, consisting of subject-verb-object and compare similar sentences constructed in English and Chinese. They talk about how the Chinese language works using some Chinese terms, with guidance, and identify some language features and textual conventions in familiar Chinese texts. They identify some Chinese vocabulary that reflect influences from other languages, and the languages and cultures represented in the classroom. Year 5 Chinese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Chinese language developed in Year 4 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Chinese language and culture.

Students communicate in Chinese, participating in oral interactions with the teacher and peers, to exchange information about their home and places in their local community. They exchange written correspondence exchanging personal information and aspects of personal experience. Students gather and compare information from a range of spoken and written texts. They also convey key points of information from these texts orally and in written form using scaffolded language.

Students describe characters from a range of short imaginative texts and create their own spoken and written imaginative texts using modelled language. Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Chinese language, identifying features of Chinese characters, including stroke types and sequences and component forms and their arrangements. They use context-related vocabulary and grammatical features to generate language for a range of purposes.

Students continue to build a metalanguage for Chinese to describe patterns, grammatical rules and variations in language structures. Students compare ways of communicating in Australian and Chinese-speaking contexts and identify ways in which culture influences language use. In Year 5 students are widening their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and Chinese. They are supported to use Chinese as much as possible for classroom routines and interactions, structured learning tasks and language experimentation and practice.

English is predominantly used for discussion, clarification, explanation, analysis and reflection.

Gather and compare information and supporting details from a range of spoken and visual texts related to their personal and social worlds ACLCHC Locate and convey key points in written informative texts related to their personal and social worlds, summarising the points to report to known audiences using learnt words, phrases and characters ACLCHC Share responses to characters in short imaginative texts such as popular songs, stories, television programs or music videos and create simple spoken imaginative texts ACLCHC Create written imaginative texts, sequencing events, using scaffolded models of texts, learnt characters or word lists for support ACLCHC Translate from Chinese to English and vice versa, simple texts used for everyday purposes, noticing which words and phrases do not readily translate and require interpretation or explanation.

Recognise the features of the Chinese writing system, identifying how character structure, position and component sequences relate the form of a character to its particular sound and meaning ACLCHU Use context-related vocabulary in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes. Describe the major features of familiar text types in Chinese, including lack of word spacing or use of punctuation and variability in text direction ACLCHU At standard, students participate in interactions in Chinese with their teacher and each other through guided tasks, class experiences, activities and transactions, to exchange information about their home and places in their community.

Students gather and compare most information and some supporting details from spoken and visual texts related to their personal and social worlds. They locate, summarise and convey most key points in written informative texts, using learnt words, phrases and characters, with some guidance. They share simple responses to characters in imaginative texts and create simple written imaginative texts, showing sequencing of events and using scaffolded models of texts, with guidance.

Students translate, with some guidance, simple texts from Chinese to English and vice versa, showing some awareness that there are words or expressions that cannot be directly translated between languages. They use dictionaries, with some guidance, and word lists to translate short familiar texts. Students identify some ways in which culture influences language use and compare with guidance, ways of communicating in Australian and Chinese-speaking contexts.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Chinese language, identifying and discriminating between most familiar homonyms, with some guidance. Students identify some of the features of the Chinese writing system and how the form of a character relates to its sound and meaning. They recognise and use vocabulary and elements of grammar with a satisfactory level of accuracy.

Students talk about how the Chinese language works using some Chinese terms, with guidance, and explore some features of familiar text types in Chinese. They describe how language is used to clarify roles and relationships between participants, and identify some ways in which Chinese is different in spoken and written forms. Year 6 Chinese: Second Language builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding required of students to communicate in the Chinese language developed in Year 5 and focuses on extending their oral and written communication skills and their understandings of Chinese language and culture.

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The perception of the hidden curriculum on medical education: an exploratory study

Students gain greater independence and become more conscious of their peers and social context. As they gain a greater awareness of the world around them they also become more aware of the similarities and differences between the Chinese language and culture and their own. Students communicate in Chinese, participating in oral interactions with others to exchange information and relate experiences about planning and organising social activities and events. They participate in guided written tasks to plan events or activities, organise displays or develop projects for a shared event.

Students gather, classify, compare and respond to information and supporting details from a range of texts related to personal and social worlds.

They share and compare responses to characters, events and ideas in a variety of imaginative texts and create simple spoken imaginative texts. Students create or reinterpret, for different audiences, written imaginative texts, describing characters and plotting a storyline. Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Chinese language, using Pinyin to record the sound of phrases or sentences with greater accuracy. They use context-related vocabulary in simple spoken and written texts to generate language for a range of purposes.

They recognise and use grammatical features to form sentences to express details. Students understand that the Chinese is characterised by diversity in spoken and written forms. They also explore values and beliefs across cultures and identify how cultural values are expressed through language.

An International Comparative Study of School Curriculums | ヒューライツ大阪

In Year 6 students continue to widen their social networks, experiences and communication repertoires in both their first language and Chinese. They are encouraged to use Chinese as much as possible for interactions, structured learning tasks and language experimentation and practice. Participate in oral interactions with others, using simple modelled descriptive and expressive language, to exchange information and relate experiences about planning and organising future social activities and events, for example, a birthday party, a shopping trip or a visit from a sister school.

Participate in guided written tasks to plan future events or activities, organise displays, develop projects or budget for a shared event, through emails, descriptions of a place, invitations, publicity fliers, or photo-stories ACLCHC Gather, classify, compare and respond to information and supporting details from a range of spoken and visual texts related to their personal and social worlds ACLCHC Locate and convey key information in a range of written and digital informative texts, related to personal and social worlds using learnt words, phrases and characters ACLCHC Share and compare responses and express personal opinions to characters, events and ideas in a variety of short imaginative texts, identify cultural elements and create simple spoken imaginative texts ACLCHC Create or reinterpret for different audiences, written imaginative texts, describing characters, plotting a storyline, using images for effect and sequencing events ACLCHC Translate and interpret simple texts, identifying actions, words and phrases that do not readily translate into English and expand descriptions or give examples where necessary to assist meaning.

Engage in intercultural experiences, describing aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar and discussing their own reactions and adjustments ACLCHC Recognise and use grammatical features to form sentences to express details such as the time, place and manner of an action and to sequence ideas, including:. Notice how the features and conventions of text organisation vary according to audience, purpose and context, for example, digital, online or face to face ACLCHU At standard, students participate in oral interactions and guided writing tasks in Chinese through collaborative tasks, class experiences, activities and transactions, to exchange some information and recount some experiences about planning and organising future social events.

They use simple modelled descriptive and expressive language with some guidance when collaborating with peers in guided tasks to organise displays, develop projects or budget for a shared event through emails, descriptions of a place, invitations, publicity fliers, or photo-stories. They gather, classify, compare and respond to most information and some supporting details from spoken and visual texts related to their personal and social worlds.

They locate some key information in written texts and convey using learnt words, characters and phrases. Students identify, with some guidance, some cultural elements, share and compare responses, and express some opinions about characters, events and ideas in simple imaginative texts. They create or adapt, with some guidance, imaginative texts for different audiences, describing characters, plotting storylines and sequencing events. Students experiment with and discuss the usefulness of various forms of dictionaries. They engage in intercultural experiences, describing simply, some aspects of language and culture that are unfamiliar, and discuss their own reactions and adjustments.

Students are becoming more familiar with the systems of the Chinese language, explaining and applying features of intonation, pronunciation and writing conventions used in different contexts and types of texts with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use vocabulary and develop and apply knowledge of grammatical elements in simple spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy.